Archives >

Season’s Greetings

As 2016 comes to a close, we look back on the past year and reflect on all of the challenges and successes to help us plan ahead for 2017.

Highlights of the Year:

  • We have said “hello” to new staff:
    • I am extremely happy to welcome onboard: Michelle, our Development and Communications Coordinator, Miranda, our Senior Wildlife Rehabilitator, and Katrina, our Education and Community Engagement Coordinator.
  • We were fortunate to receive $100,000 from the Government of Alberta through their Community Facility Enhancement Program. This funding was assigned to our mortgage as debt reduction support. Over the coming years we aim to transform the house on AIWC’s property into an education centre.
  • AIWC’s first children’s book, Scared Skunk written by authors Michelle and Denver Suttie, was launched! Scared Skunk is a perfect fit for children in grades K to 4, however, anyone at any age can learn from its true story and interesting skunk facts.
  • Two volunteer orientation sessions were held with 40 new volunteers recruited. In 2015, volunteers donated over 10,000 hours to our organization, fulfilling a variety of roles such as: wildlife rehabilitation assistant, rescue driver, hotline responder, fundraising, and construction/site maintenance.
  • 3,850 individuals were reached through our education program. Through outreach programming, we’re working to creating strong co-existence between Albertans and wildlife.
  • A video of the baby beaver we have in care went viral in July on social media. It has since reached over 15 million people worldwide! The beaver kit continues to do well in care and hasn’t let fame get to him/her 😉
  • In April, the board of directors and staff met to work on a strategic plan for the organization for the next 4 years. During this session, AIWC’s vision and mission were re-written. These are the guiding forces for everything we accomplish at AIWC, and they are as follows:

Vision: Every Wildlife Matters.

Mission: AIWC is committed to the rescue, rehabilitation, and release of injured and orphaned wildlife. We provide expert advice and education that fosters an appreciation of wildlife.

  • Over 500 animals were released back into the wild where they belong!

This year has brought a large increase in the numbers of animals admitted to our centre. We attribute some of this to more awareness about AIWC, but also that human/animal encounters, and conflicts, are rising.

In 2015, we admitted 1,675 animals. 2016 has not yet come to a close and already we have admitted nearly 1,900 animals. 95%of the animals are injured or orphaned due to human activities. The most common causes of injury are window strikes, vehicle collision, hitting power lines, barbed wire, fishing line entanglement or ingestion, domestic cat and dog attacks, and exposure to toxins.

As the demand for our services increase, so does the pressure to ensure funding to keep AIWC operational now and in the future. Thank you for your wonderful support, and for generously contributing crucial funds to directly help wildlife.

It all comes down to this:

“We don’t own the earth. We are the earth’s caretakers. We take care of it and all the things on it. And when we’re done with it, it should be left better than we found it.” 

― Katherine Hannigan, author.

 

Thank you for your continued support of AIWC.

Sincerely,

 

Holly Duvall
Executive Director.

Snowy Owls

 

With the snowy weather, it seems appropriate to talk about the aptly named snowy owl whose colouring provides excellent camouflage for our northern climate.

Snowy owls, Quebec’s provincial bird, are found across the northern hemisphere and throughout Alberta. Their range extends from the Arctic Circle, where they breed north of the 60th parallel in the summer, to as far south as Texas in the winter. Unlike many other owl species that are generally active at night, snowy owls are acclimatised to hunting throughout the day. This is because their summer range in the circumpolar region features periods of 24-hour daylight for several weeks to months around June 21, depending on the latitude.

Snowy owls typically need between seven and twelve mice-sized meals per day to remain healthy and may catch up to 1,500 additional meals each year to feed their chicks. Lemmings are a main staple in the snowy owl diet, but they have been known to eat foxes, ducks, hares, mice, and voles.

Snowy owls have few natural predators but are well-equipped with their large talons and swift flight to ward off marauding foxes that might attempt to prey on their chicks.

They build shallow nests scraped into knolls or high ridges in the tundra in spring.

If you’d like to learn more about Alberta’s wildlife, book a wildlife education program for your school group. If you’d like to support AIWC’s current patients, consider donating something from our Wish List, or purchase a set of AIWC Christmas cards to send to your loved ones to let them know about AIWC’s rehabilitation hospital as well as local wildlife!

By Stephanie Ruddock, AIWC Volunteer

Sources:

The Cornell Laboratory of Birds, All About Birds, Snow Owl. https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Snowy_Owl/lifehistory

Hinterland’s Who’s Who. Snowy Owl. http://www.hww.ca/en/wildlife/birds/snowy-owl.html?referrer=https://www.google.ca/

Porcupine Pals

It’s unlikely that you’ve seen one of these spiky critters bumbling around, since porcupines are nocturnal and tend to avoid humans at all costs.

If you were to run into a porcupine though, you might find them in treed areas, chewing on soft bark or even munching on crops in fields.

Porcupines like to live in caves, hollowed out logs, treetops and even abandoned buildings.

These large rodents are strictly vegetarians (herbivores) and enjoy a diet of bark, berries, leaves and plants. They are tree-climbing experts, although they move slowly and awkwardly when they make up their way up the tree line. When they do get up a tree, they sometimes stay up there for days to rest.

Porcupines do most of their breeding in late summer or early fall, giving birth to a single baby, called a “porcupette” in May or June. Porcupettes are quite large when they’re born, but their quills are soft to avoid hurting their mother during their birth.

Porcupettes mature rather slowly and a porcupine’s life span is usually five to six years.  In some cases they have been known to live up to ten years.

One common misconception about porcupines is that they can “throw or shoot” their quills. The truth is, porcupines can only “quill” you if you’re touching them, and there’s usually a few warning signs that come first. A porcupine who is clattering their teeth, vocalising or “displaying” her quills to you, is letting you know not to come any closer.

Despite their tough exterior, porcupines are low-key, calm, quiet creatures who tend to keep to themselves. They are one of the many unique mammals that call Alberta home and make their way into AIWC when injured or in need of help.

The holidays are a great time to help out Alberta’s wildlife! Consider adopting an animal for a loved one through AIWC’s Adopt an Animal program. Program participants receive a colour photo of their adopted animal and an adoption certificate. Give a gift that makes a difference.

By Nina Grossman, AIWC Volunteer

Sources:

http://aep.alberta.ca/fish-wildlife/human-wildlife-conflict/porcupines.aspx

http://albertatravel.org/Porcupines_Alberta.htm

http://www.strathcona.ca/departments/transportation-and-agriculture-services/animals-and-wildlife/animals/porcupines/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chickadee and Nuthatch Stay for the Winter

Most birds migrate south during the winter when the weather gets too cold. However, there are some species that will remain in Calgary all year long. Two of these species that are commonly seen in Calgary are the black-capped chickadee and the red-breasted nuthatch.

How are these birds able to withstand the cold winters? Food gathering and roosting strategies help sustain these birds. In combination with proper winter roosts and a healthy supply of food caches, both of these birds are able to stay year round in Calgary.

Black-capped chickadees live in deciduous treed areas or mixed wood forests, where they create a roosting hole in rotten wood, which provides protection and insulation against sub-zero temperatures. Most of the time, the roosting holes are for one chickadee only.

They eat seeds, berries, plant material, and insects. They have a good memory which comes in handy as they store food in thousands of hiding places and rely on those stores throughout the winter!

Red-breasted nuthatches live in coniferous treed areas but often use aspen trees (when available) for their nesting cavities. The male will create several nesting cavities, often in dead trees, dead parts of a live tree, or trees with broken tops, and the female will choose the nest she prefers. Both birds will roost here throughout the winter season.

The diet of the red-breasted nuthatch is not as diverse as the black-capped chickadee in the winter, and relies mostly on conifer seeds. Similar to the chickadee, the nuthatch will also store food and come back to it throughout the winter season. In the non-winter seasons, the nuthatch will eat insects as well as conifer seeds.

Interesting facts:

  • Both of these birds can be seen in parks throughout Calgary. A great place to view these birds is the Inglewood Bird Sanctuary.
  • The red-breasted nuthatch and the black-capped chickadee have very different calls. The black-capped chickadee call is whistely and sounds like he is saying “hey, sweetie” and the red-breasted nuthatch has a more nasily call the sounds like she is saying “yank-yank”. If you’re interested, you can listen to the chickadee here (https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Black-capped_Chickadee/sounds) and the nuthatch here (https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Red-breasted_Nuthatch/sounds).
  • The Boreal chickadee has a similar call to the black-capped chickadee, but sounds like he has a cold. Listen to his call here (https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Boreal_Chickadee/sounds).
  • Other birds that associate with chickadee flocks, such as the red-breasted nuthatch, respond to chickadee alarm calls.
  • The physiology of the black-capped chickadee and the red-breast nuthatch feet differ, allowing these species to grasp onto trees differently. The chickadee has feet that have evolved for perching, and allows them to eat plant foliage easily. Whereas, the nuthatch has feet that have evolved for climbing, which allows them to walk on the side of a tree trunk while foraging bark for insects in the warmer seasons.
  • Red-breasted nuthatches are fairly aggressive for their size, and will often compete with bigger birds for food.
  • Both of these birds will feed off of bird feeders in yards all year round.

Sources:

Cornel University. 2015. Black-capped chickadee. Available on line: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Black-capped_Chickadee/lifehistory

Cornel University. 2015. Red-breasted nuthatch. Available on line: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Red-breasted_Nuthatch/lifehistory

Bird foot diagram: http://www.sciencebuddies.org/Files/3491/5/Zoo_img037.jpg

By Tayler Hamilton, AIWC Volunteer

Season of Giving

It’s almost that time of year again to gather with family and friends to celebrate the holiday season.  The season brings with it different things for different people. But it often includes giving.  This ritual can take place in a variety of ways… sharing  in a gift exchange with those who are special to us, time spent volunteering at a local animal shelter, feeding those who are less fortunate a holiday dinner at a local soup kitchen, or donating to one’s favorite charity. 

Why not make wildlife part of that giving and sharing?

There are several ways to help Alberta Institute for Wildlife Conservation’s injured and orphaned wildlife this season:

Share in the love of reading with the children in your life. Purchase your copy of AIWC’s first children’s book – “Scared Skunk”. This book is the perfect fit for children in grades K to 4, however, anyone at any age can learn from its true story and interesting skunk facts.

scaredskunk_cover

Celebrate the holiday season by sending an AIWC Christmas card to the loved ones in your life. Each set contains envelopes, and 2 copies of 5 different card designs featuring AIWC patients and native Alberta wildlife.

Start the New Year with our beautiful 2017 calendar. This colour, 12-month calendar features wildlife admitted to AIWC within the last year and information about the species featured for each month. This is a must-have gift for the wildlife lovers in your life.

Front cover of large calendar.

Front cover of large calendar.

All proceeds from the sale of the books, cards and calendars go towards supporting the care of AIWC’s injured and orphaned wildlife. For more information on how to purchase these lovely items, go to our website and click on “support us”.

Thank you and happy holidays from all of us at AIWC!

Snow Tracks

 

Winter is a slower season for AIWC as many birds travel south and young animals are no longer as dependent on their mothers for survival. That makes this season a great opportunity to learn more about wildlife by observing animal tracks in the snow!

Following tracks can help you learn more about the habits of different species and determine whether the animal is domestic or wild. Domestic cats and dogs can often be distinguished by the meandering patterns of their tracks while wildlife will tend to pick more direct paths. Dogs will often zigzag to explore every interesting scent leaving 4 distinct paw prints in the process while coyotes and wolves will tend to “single-track” meaning their rear paw will land in the same space their front paw leaves. Single-tracking allows wild canines to move more quickly and efficiently while expending less energy. This can be very important between meals especially in the colder winter months.

The size and depth of the track can also give clues about which animal left the print. Ruminants like deer, elk, and moose all create similarly shaped prints with deer being the smallest and moose being the largest. Moose tracks will often include the dew claws as a possible hint.

Tracks can also help determine which direction an animal is moving, but this can sometimes be deceptive. For example, hares lead with their back feet so the larger print will be in the front and indicate the direction of travel despite the tracks appearing to travel in the opposite direction.

A variety of workshops and guided tours are available throughout Alberta in the winter months to help you learn more about identifying animal tracks in the snow. Check with local parks and conservation areas for upcoming courses and enhance your track identification skills!

Holy Crow!

They might be perched on trees, electricity wires, housetops or maybe filling the sky in swarms of “murders.” Crows seem to be everywhere! But how much do you really know about these sleek, smart birds?

Crows have slick black feathers, fan-shaped tails and small bills – or small at least compared to the Common Raven, a bird similar in appearance.

Commonly known as the “American Crow,” this species can be found all across North America.

Crows are highly adaptable and can survive in a variety of environments. Habitats include urban areas, agricultural fields and shrub-lands. Crows are common near forest edges but can also be found in grassland and parkland habitats.

Males like to perch and display on streetlights – spreading their wings and tail feathers, puffing up their bodies and bowing and uttering rattling calls to attract females.

Crows like to line their nests with fur and soft material, constructing the outer shell with large sticks and branches. Female crows usually lay 4-6 eggs and incubate them for up to 18 days.

Crows tend to stick around for most of the year, but some choose to fly south near the end of November. After mating in the fall, thousands of American crows group together in flocks (called “murders”). The University of Calgary is a great place to spot flocks of them on electricity lines and rooftops.

Crows are opportunistic eaters! They feed on bugs, other bird’s eggs and nestlings, berries, seeds and human garbage. Studies suggest that crows have the ability to recognise patterns for eg. they learn what days the garbage truck rolls in so they can cash in on the all the garbage if it isn’t in properly sealed garbage bins.

One of the most interesting facts about crows is their ability to recognise human faces! According to the National Wildlife Foundation, studies have proven crows to be persistently hostile towards certain people, even if they haven’t seen them in years.

Crows are pretty smart cookies. Some scientists believe that they are strong communicators and have the ability to share information, strategize and execute plans!

Next time you see an ebony-feathered crow, know that you are looking at a clever, resourceful bird!

By Nina Grossman, AIWC volunteer

Pelicans

In light of AIWC’s recent pelican patient, it became clear to me that many people don’t realize we have pelicans in Alberta. That’s totally ok, because not everyone lives and breathes wildlife (AIWC staff and volunteers, I’m talking about you!)  This blog is going to give you information about pelicans, hopefully more than you knew before reading it.

Pelicans belong to the Pelecanidae family, and there are a total of eight different pelican species throughout the world. These water-loving birds can be found inland and along coastlines. The different species range in colour from white to grey to brown to black.

The species found in Alberta is the American white pelican (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos). Other than size difference, female and male American white pelicans have the same appearance – orange bills and legs, white feathers on the body, and black posterior feathers at the tip of the wings that can be seen in their silhouette while flying, but are difficult to see when on water or ground.

Mostly everyone knows what a pelican is because of their unique bill. Their bills are very large, with a flat top and a large throat sac on the bottom. Pelicans do not store food in their beaks!

During breeding season, the bill, iris, bare skin around the eyes, and the feet become a more brilliant orange to impress the mate. An interesting fact about the bill of this particular pelican species is the upper bill grows a laterally flattened 3 inch horn (otherwise known as a caruncle) about 1/3 the length of the bill from the tip of the bill. The horn is the shape of half a circle, both males and females grow them, and it is believed to be sexual ornamentation to aid in helping get the best mate. After mating season is over, the horn is shed and the orange colours become increasingly dull. No other species of pelican grows this horn!

Other pelican species dive to catch fish, but these pelicans catch food from the surface of water while swimming. Pelicans eat more than 4 lbs of fish per day. That’s the equivalent of 20-35% of their body weight (the average weight of a pelican ranges between 11 to 20 lbs).

These birds are believed to be social birds, and nest on river islands in colonies with several hundred pairs – often up to 5,000 birds. Like several other bird species, these pelicans mate for life (their lifespan in the wild is over 17 years!).

American white pelicans are found in Alberta during their mating season, which usually ranges from March or April until September or October. They migrate south to the Pacific and the Gulf of Mexico Coasts, and tend to live in estuaries, lakes, and rivers. This species tend to avoid the open seashore and open ocean, and fly over land during their migration.

The American white pelican is globally listed as a species of least concern. However, conflicts with humans still occur. The most common anthropogenic issues with American white pelicans include, but are not limited to, habitat loss, fishing gear incidents, boating disturbances, and poaching,

Remember, if you see injured wildlife, call AIWC for help or advice at 403-946-2361.

By Tayler Hamilton, AIWC Volunteer.

Sources:

https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/American_White_Pelican/id

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pelican

http://www.arkive.org/american-white-pelican/pelecanus-erythrorhynchos/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_white_pelican

https://www3.northern.edu/natsource/BIRDS/Americ1.htm

Long-eared Owl

 

 

long-eared-owl

 

Recently, a long-eared owl underwent one of AIWC’s first onsite surgeries in several years to repair an exposed fracture. The vets are optimistic about him making a full recovery.

While the wide eyes, orange facial disks, and tall feather tufts of the long-eared owl give this bird the appearance of being ever-startled, the close set feathers atop their heads are meant to protect them from being surprised by other animals. By elongating their bodies and ear tufts, long-eared owls camouflage themselves by looking like tree branches to avoid being seen by possible predators. As a quite slender bird of prey, long-eared owls risk predation from larger raptors like great-horned owls and bald eagles. Magpies, crows, and hawks have also been known to prey on long-eared owl eggs and nestlings.

Long-eared owls are almost strictly nocturnal, hunting small rodents and birds at night. When they are not caring for young owlets, long-eared owls will roost in groups, but are among the most secretive owls and are rarely heard or seen. These birds prefer dense forests and are partially migratory so you may be lucky enough to see one this season travelling slightly farther south of his/her breeding range to overwinter.

If you would like to help support the long-eared owl’s recovery, or any other animal in our care, consider adopting an animal, donating items on our wish list, or volunteering at the centre. If you find injured wildlife, please call the centre for assistance at 403.946.2361.

By Stephanie Ruddock, AIWC Volunteer

Sources:

http://www.simplywildcanada.com/wild-species/birds-of-canada/owls-of-canada/

http://aep.alberta.ca/fish-wildlife/wild-species/birds/owls/long-eared-owl.aspx

 

Scared Skunk

Scared Skunk is AIWC’s first children’s book and the third book Michelle and Denver Suttie have written for an animal charity.

The goal of these books is to share true stories about animals, and in doing so, give the reader an awareness and understanding about issues wild animals face.

Unfortunately, there are so many issues wildlife face that it’s hard to pick just one to write about. With that said, this book was inspired by the increase in skunks AIWC received this year. As of October 7th, 83 striped skunks had been admitted to AIWC – the majority of them being baby skunks (kits).  That’s an increase of 176% since 2014! The major cause for admissions is due to an increase in human-wildlife encounters.

This book highlights AIWC’s messaging:  Our actions impact the environment and its wildlife.
In this case; a skunk kit who has become orphaned due to her mother being trapped, causing her to have to search for food on her own which leads her to an encounter with litter.

Scared Skunk reminds us that we all have a shared responsibility to wildlife!

The book is packed with interesting facts about skunks that anyone, at any age, can learn from. The facts in this
book—called skunk statements—give the reader a way to get to know the character, and in some cases, may dispel any myths or opinions surrounding her as well.

These books are a nice fit in the K to 3 classrooms or the children’s section of the library, and provide the perfect opportunity for discussion around the family dinner table.

Scared Skunk will be launched on Wednesday October 12th and can be purchased
on-line by visiting our website, and are available at these locations:

* Wildbird General Store in Edmonton * Purearth Organics in Red Deer *

* Deja Brew in Cochrane * Yamnuska Wolfdog Sanctuary in Cochrane *

*The Wild Bird Store in Calgary*

 100% of proceeds are donated to Alberta Institute for Wildlife Conservation.

« Previous PageNext Page »